National Day of Mourning – April 28

Day of Mourning -April 28

The National Day of Mourning, held annually on April 28, was officially recognized by the federal government in 1991, eight years after the day of remembrance was launched by the Canadian Labour Congress. The Day of Mourning has since spread to about 80 countries around the world and has been adopted by the AFL-CIO and the International Confederation of Free Trade.

The numbers tell the story. In 2013, 902* workplace deaths were recorded in Canada. While it’s the lowest total since 2000 when 882 fatalities were recorded, this number still represents 2.47 deaths every single day.
In the 21 year period from 1993 to 2013, 18,941* people lost their lives due to work-related causes (an average of 902 deaths per year).

The Canadian flag on Parliament Hill will fly at half-mast. Workers will light candles, don ribbons and black armbands and observe moments of silence. Businesses are asked to participate by declaring April 28 a Day of Mourning and to strive to prevent workplace deaths, illnesses and injuries.

CCOHS hopes that the annual observance of this day will strengthen the resolve to establish safe conditions in the workplace, and prevent injuries and deaths. As much as this is a day to remember the dead, it is also a call to protect the living.

*Fatalities accepted in 2013 according to “Number of Fatalities, by Jurisdiction 1993-2013” summary table, statistics from the Association of Workers Compensation Boards of Canada

Annual average according to “Number of Fatalities, by Jurisdiction 1993-2013” summary table, statistics from the Association of Workers Compensation Boards of Canada

Share on social media!

Comments are closed.